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JOHNNY STRICKLAND,
Plaintiff-Appellant,
v.
CITY OF DETROIT, MICHIGAN; JAMES CRAIG; MARK BLISS; RODNEY BALLINGER; STEVEN MURDOCK; CASEY SCHIMECK; DEANNA WILSON,
Defendants-Appellees.
   No. 19-2373
Appeal from the United States District Court
for the Eastern District of Michigan at Detroit.
No. 2:18-cv-12640—Nancy G. Edmunds, District Judge.
Argued: October 23, 2020
Decided and Filed: April 22, 2021
Before: CLAY, GIBBONS, and NALBANDIAN, Circuit Judges.


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OPINION
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CLAY, Circuit Judge. Plaintiff Johnny Strickland appeals, in part, the district court’s order granting summary judgment in favor of his employer, the City of Detroit (“the City”), as well as Detroit Police Chief James Craig, Commander Mark Bliss, Sergeant Rodney Ballinger, Officer Steven Murdock, Officer Casey Schimeck, and Sergeant Deanna Wilson. On appeal, Plaintiff claims that the City maintained a hostile work environment, in violation of Title VII of the Civil Rights Acts of 1964, 42 U.S.C. § 2000e et seq., and retaliated against him for reporting racial discrimination, also in violation of Title VII, specifically § 2000e-3(a). He also asserts that Officer Schimeck is not entitled to qualified immunity on his excessive force claim brought pursuant to § 1983. For the reasons that follow, we affirm in part and reverse in part the district court’s grant of summary judgment.



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RICARDO TORRES,
Plaintiff-Appellee,
v.
PRECISION INDUSTRIES, INC.,
Defendant-Appellant.
   No. 20-5492
Appeal from the United States District Court
for the Western District of Tennessee at Jackson.
No. 1:16-cv-01319—S. Thomas Anderson, District Judge.
Decided and Filed: April 22, 2021
Before: GRIFFIN, KETHLEDGE, and THAPAR, Circuit Judges.


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OPINION
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PER CURIAM. Federal law makes it illegal to employ undocumented aliens, but Tennessee’s workers’ compensation law still protects them. So if a Tennessee company fires an undocumented employee for filing a workers’ compensation claim, the employee can sue for damages. Because of the federal law, the company cannot be required to pay lost wages that the alien was not allowed to earn. But it’s still on the hook for wages the employee could have lawfully received, as well as for other damages unrelated to the employee’s immigration status.

Ricardo Torres obtained authorization to work in the United States several months after he was fired for filing a workers’ compensation claim. The district court appropriately awarded him backpay for the period in which he was authorized to work, plus non-economic and punitive damages. But the court mistakenly included two extra months’ wages in the backpay calculation. We reduce the damage award accordingly and affirm.



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UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,
Plaintiff-Appellee/Cross-Appellant,
v.
KENNETH J. JACKSON, JR.,
Defendant-Appellant/Cross-Appellee.
   Nos. 19-3623/3711
Appeal from the United States District Court
for the Northern District of Ohio at Cleveland.
No. 1:15-cr-00453-1—Patricia A. Gaughan, District Judge.
Decided and Filed: April 22, 2021
Before: BATCHELDER, MOORE, and BUSH, Circuit Judges.


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OPINION
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JOHN K. BUSH, Circuit Judge. As judges, we assume that Congress says what it means and means what it says. That is why statutory interpretation begins with the text. FNU Tanzin v. Tanzir, 141 S. Ct. 486, 489 (2020). When Congress reduced the scope of 18 U.S.C. § 924(c)’s extreme penalties, it said how the amendments apply to past crimes. They apply for a defendant on whom “a sentence for the offense has not been imposed as of” December 21, 2018. First Step Act § 403(b) (codified at 18 U.S.C. § 924 notes). As of that day, a sentence had been imposed on Kenneth Jackson, Jr. That we later vacated his first sentence does not alter Jackson’s status on the day the First Step Act became law. For that reason, we again vacate his sentence and remand for resentencing.



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UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,
Plaintiff-Appellee,
v.
JANKIE JACKSON (18-5676); PETER COMBS (18-6003),
Defendants-Appellants.
   Nos. 18-5676/6003
Appeal from the United States District Court
for the Eastern District of Kentucky at London.
No. 6:17-cr-00014—Gregory F. Van Tatenhove, District Judge.
Argued: October 6, 2020
Decided and Filed: April 22, 2021
Before: DAUGHTREY, DONALD, and READLER, Circuit Judges.


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AMENDED OPINION
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CHAD A. READLER, Circuit Judge. Jankie Jackson and Peter Combs pleaded guilty to participating in a cocaine distribution ring. Both defendants received elevated sentences, Jackson due to his role as a leader in the drug-distribution conspiracy, and Combs due to his alleged career-offender status. Seeing no error in Jackson’s sentence, we affirm that aspect of the district court’s judgment. Due to intervening circuit precedent, however, we reverse the district court’s career-offender finding for Combs and remand for resentencing.